Big Update

Its been quite a while since my last post, so here’s a big one…..

I’ve been doing a lot of 3D printing since I received my FlashForge Creator Pro 2016. I learned OpenSCAD and FreeCAD, my designs are here. I’ve made various enclosures for Arduino’s and Raspberry Pi’s, as well as USBASP cases, voltmeter cases, solder tip holders, calliper battery savers, resistor forming tools, soldering helping hands, bottle openers, trolley tokens, SD card holders, PIR cases, Dremel accessories, various 3D printer upgrades and the usual calibration prints.

Yesterday I upgraded Dad’s Lenovo B570 laptop to Ubuntu 16.04 from 12.04, which was fun due to its broken EFI setup – basically it has a BIOS and not SecureBoot but the installer sees it as using GPT+EFI instead of a simple MBR. Weirdness such as failure to boot from USB and then failure to boot from HDD once I’d installed from DVD ensued. Boot-Repair fixed the problem, from what I can see it installed some dummy EFI files in the EFI partition, which the 12.04 install obviously nuked. Had to disable hardware acceleration in Chrome to prevent Flash flickering, but otherwise it seems to be working fine.

Today I modified an SG90 servo for continuous rotation, basically removed the wiper on the potentiometer and replaced it with a couple of SMD resistors, and cut the tab off of the largest gear. I found that there is no trimpot to adjust the zero position on my servo so I altered my code to send 100 instead of 90 for “stop”, which I found using some trial and error. Values lower than 100 move clockwise (the lower the number, the faster movement) and greater than 100 moves anti-clockwise (the higher, the faster).

When you write a value to the servo, you’re no longer giving it a degree value, you’re setting a pusle width. So instead of “rotate to 40 degrees” you’re saying “run for 1200uS”, just like a DC motor with H-bridge, which is essentially what is inside a servo. The upside is that the servo can rotate 360 degrees, the downside is that you don’t know where its rotated to as the microcontroller receives no feedback.

My test code is below – its moves it left, right, fast, slow and stop.

continuous_servo.ino

#include <Servo.h>

// create servo object
Servo myservo;

// speeds for my sg90
#define FASTCW  45
#define SLOWCW  90
#define STOP    100
#define FASTACW 135
#define SLOWACW 110

void setup()
{
    // attach servo to D9
    myservo.attach(9);
}

void loop()
{
    myservo.write(FASTCW);
    delay(2000);

    myservo.write(STOP);
    delay(1000);

    myservo.write(FASTACW);
    delay(2000);

    myservo.write(STOP);
    delay(1000);

    myservo.write(SLOWCW);
    delay(2000);

    myservo.write(STOP);
    delay(1000);

    myservo.write(SLOWACW);
    delay(2000);
    
    myservo.write(STOP);
    delay(1000);
}

Makefile

BOARD_TAG = uno
MONITOR_PORT = /dev/ttyUSB0
include /usr/share/arduino/Arduino.mk

I’ve also been making custom power cables lately, such as a USB to DC jack for giving 5v to older projects such as a 555 astable from a powerbank. It seems that microUSB should be the new go-to connector for power instead of 2.1×5.5mm DC jacks these days. I’ve actually got some USB-to-DIP breakout boards as well as the TP4056 Li-On charger boards. I’ve also got some USB boost regulators on the way that apparently can output up to 28v or something silly. My next custom cable will likely be banana plugs to pin headers as its a pain trying to put a male pin header on a screw terminal.

Finally I had a play with a MCP23017 port expander which I was thinking of using when my ESP8266 projects don’t have enough pins – like my RTC clock could have done with 1-2 more buttons. But it seems like a lot of wiring e.g. 8 pins before you’ve even added any I/O, and a lot of calls to the Wire library e.g. 4 calls just to send an output like lighting an LED, so I think I’ll hold out for ESP32’s to be generally available before doing any more pin-intensive projects.